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437th Troop Carrier Group

437th Troop Carrier Group



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437th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF)

History - Books - Aircraft - Time Line - Commanders - Main Bases - Component Units - Assigned To

History

The 437th Troop Carrier Group (USAAF) took part in the D-Day landings, the invasion of the South of France, Operation Market Garden and the Crossing of the Rhine.

The group was activated in the US on 1 May 1943. The 437th was one of twelve groups to join the Ninth Air Force direct from the United States in the first half of 1944, crossing to Britain in January-February 1944.

Early on D-Day the group towed gliders to the Cherbourg area. Later on D-Day and on 7 June the group carried reinforcements and supplies to the 82nd Airborne Division. The group was awarded a Distinguished Unit Citation for its role in the Normandy campaign.

In July 1944 a detachment from the group moved to Italy in order to take part in Operation Dragoon, the invasion of the South of France. On 15 August the group dropped paratroops in the invasion area. On 16 August it carried reinforcements to France. For the next few days it carried supplies within Italy, before returning to Britain on 24 August.

During Operation Market Garden (September 1944) the group towed gliders in the initial assault and then flew a number of missions bringing supplies and reinforcements to the airborne troops.

In February 1945 the group moved to France, ready for the crossing of the Rhine. On 24 March each aircraft in the group towed two gliders to Wesel on the east bank of the Rhine.

In March-April 1945 the group carried supplies, most importantly fuel, to the rapidly advancing ALlied armies.

Between these major missions the group acted as a normal transport unit, carrying supplies to the front and evacuating the wounded.

The group was used to fly liberated POWs out of Germany. It returned to the US in August 1945 and was inactivated on 15 November.

Books

Pending

Aircraft

1943-1945: Douglas C-47 Skytrain and Curtiss C-46 Commando

Timeline

15 April 1943Constituted as 437th Troop Carrier Group
1 May 1943Activated
Jan-Feb 1944To England and Ninth Air Force
August 1945To United States
15 November 1945Inactivated

Commanders (with date of appointment)

Col Cedric E Hudgens: 1 May 1943
Col Donald J French: 12 Jun1944-1945

Main Bases

Baer Field, Ind: 1 May 1943
Sedalia AAFld, Mo: 8 Jun 1943
PopeField, NC: 10 Oct 1943
Baer Field, Ind:29 Dec 1943-Jan 1944
Balderton, England:Jan 1944
Ramsbury, England: 5 Feb 1944
Coulommiers/Voisins, France: 25 Feb-Jul1945
Baer Field, Ind: 15 Aug 1945
MarfaAAFld, Tex: 14 Sep-15 Nov 1945

Component Units

83rd: 1943-1945
84th: 1943-1945
85th: 1943-1945
86th: 1943-1945

Assigned To

1943: 53rd Troop Carrier Wing; US based
1944-45: 53rd Troop Carrier Wing; IX Troop Carrier Command; Ninth Air Force


435th Operations Group

The 435th Operations Group is an inactive United States Air Force unit. Its last assignment was with the 435th Airlift Wing at Rhein-Main Air Base, Germany, where it was inactivated on 1 April 1995.

The unit was first activated during World War II as the 435th Troop Carrier Group, a Douglas C-47 Skytrain transport unit that saw combat with IX Troop Carrier Command in Western Europe. The group flew paratroopers on airborne assaults on Normandy (Operation Overlord) Southern France (Operation Dragoon) the Netherlands (Operation Market Garden), and Germany (Operation Varsity). It also flew combat resupply missions in the relief of Bastogne in 1945. The 435th was awarded a Distinguished Unit Citation for its actions during the Normandy invasion.

The group was activated in the reserve in 1947. It was called to active duty in March 1951 for the Korean War, serving at its home station, Miami International Airport. It returned to reserve duty in December 1952 and continued to serve in the reserves until November 1959, when it was inactivated and its squadrons assigned directly to the 435th Troop Carrier Wing in a reorganization of Continental Air Command reserve units.

The group was reactivated in England in July 1975 as the 435th Tactical Airlift Group, a headquarters for airlift units deployed there. It moved to Rhein-Main Air Base, Germany in October 1978 and was inactivated there in July 1980. When the 435th Wing reorganized under the Objective Wing organization, the group reactivated as the 435th Operations Group. It was inactivated when United States Air Forces Europe reduced its presence at Rhein-Main as it transferred its European airlift operations to Ramstein Air Base, Germany.


437th Troop Carrier Group

In Memory of Our Fallen Comrades world war two

Normandy , Ardennes , Northern France Rome , Arno , Southern France Rhineland , Central Europe.

In Memory of Our Fallen Comrades WWII

Normandy — Ardennes — Northern France
Rome — Arno — Southern France
Rhineland — Central Europe

Location. 39° 0.979′ N, 104° 51.31′ W. Marker is in United States Air Force Academy, Colorado, in El Paso County. Marker is in the United States Air Force Academy Cemetery, on Parade Loop west of Stadium Boulevard, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: USAF Academy CO 80840, United States of America. Touch for directions.

Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 379 th Bomb Group (H) (here, next to this marker) World War II Glider Pilots (here, next to this marker) 306 th Bombardment Group (H) (here, next to this marker) 95 th Bomb Group H (here, next to this marker) 492nd Bomb Group (H) & 801st Bomb Group (P) (here, next to this marker) 416th Bombardment Group (L) (here, next to this marker) 20th Fighter Group (here, next to this marker) 344 th Bomb Group (M) AAF (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in United States Air Force Academy.

More about this marker. Must have a valid ID to enter the USAF Academy grounds.


The group consists of the following units:

World War II [ edit | edit source ]

From May–December 1943, the 437th Troop Carrier Group trained with cargo planes in Indiana, Missouri, and North Carolina. In January 1944, the group deployed to England, where it prepared for the invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. During the Normandy campaign, the group released gliders over Cherbourg and carried troops, weapons, ammunition, rations, and other supplies for the 82nd Airborne Division in Operation Neptune. For these actions, the group received a Distinguished Unit Citation.

The air echelon deployed to Italy in July 1944 and participated in the Allied invasion of southern France in August 1944 dropping paratroops of the 1st Airborne Task Force. During Operation Market Garden in September 1944, the group released gliders carrying troops and equipment for the airborne attack in the occupied Netherlands. In December 1944, the group re-supplied the 101st Airborne Division in the Bastogne area of Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge. After moving to France in February 1945, the unit released gliders in support of an American crossing of the Rhine River called Operation Varsity in March 1945. The 437th continued to supply the offensive forces in April, while also evacuating wounded personnel to rear-zone hospitals. After V-E Day, the group evacuated prisoners of war and displaced persons to relocation centers. The group then returned to the United States and was inactivated.

Cold War [ edit | edit source ]

Trained as a reserve unit until August 1950, when it was ordered to active duty because of the outbreak of war in Korea and later moved to Japan in November 1950. Between December 1950 and June 1952, the group airlifted ammunition, rations, aircraft parts, gasoline, and other war supplies from Japan to United Nations bases in Korea, while evacuating wounded troops from Korea to hospitals in Japan. During 1951, the 437th also dropped paratroops and flew re-supply and reinforcement missions in support of the Eighth Army in Korea. Between January–June 1952, the group transported battlefield replacements and evacuated troops on leave. From June 1952 – November 1957, the group again served as Reserve training organization flying C-46s.

Modern era [ edit | edit source ]

Activated as part of Objective Organization adoption by 437 AW in October 1991. Assumed control of operational squadrons. Routinely deployed aircraft and aircrews in support of humanitarian and contingency operations in the Balkans, Southwest Asia, Africa, Russia, and provided disaster relief support, 1992–2001. Supported Global War on Terrorism contingencies from October 2001–.


Established as 437 Troop Carrier Group on 15 Apr 1943 and activated on 1 May 1943. The unit trained with cargo planes in Indiana, Missouri, and North Carolina. In Jan 1944, the group deployed to England, where it prepared for the invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. [2]

During the Normandy campaign, the 437 released gliders over Cherbourg and carried troops, weapons, ammunition, rations, and other supplies for the 82nd Airborne Division during Operation Neptune. The group received a Distinguished Unit Citation (DUC) for these actions. The group deployed to Italy in Jul 1944 and participated in Operation Dragoon, the Allied invasion of southern France in Aug 1944 dropping paratroops of the 1st Airborne Task Force. [2]

During Operation Market Garden in Sep 1944, the group released gliders carrying troops and equipment for the airborne attack in the occupied Netherlands. In Dec 1944, the group re-supplied the 101st Airborne Division in the Bastogne area of Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge. After moving to France in Feb 1945, the unit released gliders in support of an American crossing of the Rhine River called Operation Varsity on 24 March 1945. The 437 Troop Carrier Group continued supplying American forces until the end of the war. After victory in Europe in May 1945, the group evacuated prisoners of war and displaced persons. [2]

Korean War

The 437th stood up as a wing and trained in the reserve from June 1949 to August 1950. On 15 August 1950, the main contingent of the 437th Troop Carrier Wing was called up for active service in the Korean War.

Moved to Shaw AFB, South Carolina, At that time 1,441 men were assigned to the 437th Troop Carrier Wing, and began a training program. On 15 October, the day before the 437th left Shaw, it got up to its full wartime strength of 1,569. Most of the additional men came from the Regular Air Force, including 60 from Sewart AFB, Tennessee, and another 59 fresh from basic training at Lackland AFB. The Wing had a total of forty-eight C-46s, obtained from various units.

Augmented by a few maintenance personnel, the command and operations elements of the wing deployed their C-46s to Japan. They arrived at Brady AB, Kyushu, Japan, at sundown on 8 November, just as the main body of the wing, which had crossed the Pacific aboard ship, marched in from the railroad station. The maintenance force quickly removed the long-range fuel tanks which had been installed for the overwater flight. Thirty-six hours after the first plane had landed, the 437th Troop Carrier Wing sent its first three planes on a routine combat cargo mission to Pyongyang Airfield (K-21) in North Korea, at the time under United Nations control.

The 437th Troop Carrier Wing conducted operations for Combat Cargo Command, a provisional organization assigned to the Fifth Air Force, for support and administration. During the last 52 days of 1950, the wing flew almost 3,500 hours, conducting more than 1,500 effective combat sorties carrying passengers, cargo, or patients. When the 437th arrived in the theater, United Nations forces were driving north, and the U.S. Air Force was using airfields at Sinanju and Yonpo in North Korea. As the Chinese Communist forces struck south, however, the 437th helped evacuate these bases. Soon 437th aircrews were helping move everything out of the airstrips near Pyongyang, and by year's end they were evacuating Kimpo Air Base near Seoul, South Korea.

In December 1950, the 437th acquired the responsibility for conducting Combat Cargo Command's scheduled courier operation, connecting all the major Japanese and Korean air bases and strips. As the U.N. forces pressed their attack in the early months of 1951, it became necessary to augment the Army's overburdened supply system with airdrops of supplies. On 24 February the 437th conducted the first of many missions to resupply frontline U.S. Eighth Army troops. The wing participated in its first combat personnel airborne drop on 23 March 1951, at Munsan-ni. The unit and the C-119 Flying Boxcar-equipped 314th Troop Carrier Wing conducted a week's intensive training preparing to drop the 187th Regimental Combat Team at Chunchon. Then on 21 March, forty-eight hours before it was to go, the mission was changed, not an unusual circumstance in fluid battlefield conditions. The 187th was now to be dropped at Munsan-ni instead of Chunchon, and that, on the morning of the 23d, not the 21st.

Weather on the 23d was perfect, and for 30 minutes before the drop, B-26s of the 3d and 452d Bomb Wings softened up the objective area with 500-pound air-burst bombs and low-level strafing and rocket attacks. In addition to 55 C-46s, the 437th provided several crew members who had recently transitioned into C-119s to augment the 314th's crews. The wing's planes dropped 1,446 troops and 15 1/2 tons of ammunition, food, and signal equipment. Enemy interference was meager, and the wing suffered no injuries to personnel nor damage to aircraft.

On 25 January 1951, Far East Air Forces discontinued Combat Cargo Command and activated the 315th Air Division (Combat Cargo). Like its predecessor, the 315th was directly subordinated to Far East Air Forces. The 437th Troop Carrier Wing's tour of active military service ended on 10 June 1952, when it was inactivated and returned to the control of the Air Force Reserve. Its personnel, then all active force replacements, and its equipment were transferred to the concurrently activated 315th Troop Carrier Wing (Medium) at Brady AB, Japan.

Cold War

The 1608th Air Transport Wing based at Charleston AFB S.C. flew cargo support missions throughout the world from 1955 to 1966 which included among others downrange support for the space missions in the early 60’s transporting the space capsules back to Cape Canaveral.

During this period the 1608th consisted of the 3rd and 17th Air Transport Squadrons flying C-124s and the 41st and 76th squadrons flying C-130s. The 3rd squadrons C-124s performed troop airlift missions moving U.N troops from Europe to the combat zones of the Congo War in 1961. The 1608th’s aircraft were instrumental in providing airlift for the Vietnam War buildup in the early 60s.

Missions involving Panama, Granada, the planned invasion of Cuba and other hot spots in the world were performed by the 1608th during this time period.

The 437th Military Airlift Wing replaced the 1608th Air Transport Wing, in 1966, as the Military Airlift Command host wing at Charleston Air Force Base, South Carolina. It has since flown joint training missions with Army forces, aeromedical evacuation missions, mercy and humanitarian missions as needed, and airlifted personnel, cargo, and mail worldwide, primarily to Europe, the Middle East and Africa, but also to South America. The 437th converted from the C-124 Globemaster to the C-141 Starlifter in 1965 and was the first Air Force unit to receive the C-5 Galaxy in 1970. The wing flew both aircraft until 1973 when its C-5s were transferred to Dover AFB, Delaware and Dovers C-141s were moved to Charleston. It has participated in numerous tactical operations and exercises, particularly those of NATO. Wing aircrews have been augmented by attached Reserve aircrews from the 315th Airlift Wing. From 1966 to the early 1970s, the wing also flew numerous missions to the Far East and Southeast Asia. It added Russia as a special mission destination in 1988 and conducted humanitarian relief operations in Russia in 1992. The wing deployed support personnel and provided airlift of personnel and equipment for operations in Grenada, 24 October󈝿 December 1983 Panama, 18󈞉 December 1989 and Southwest Asia, August 1990 – December 1991. It flew humanitarian missions to Somalia and other regions of Africa from 1992 to 1994.

Modern era

The 437th received its first C-17 in June 1993. It routinely supported humanitarian and contingency operations in the Balkans, 1993�. The wing has also conducted long range humanitarian air drops into Afghanistan during Operation Enduring Freedom beginning in October 2001 and later regularly supported deployments to other Global War on Terrorism operations, as well as Operation Iraqi Freedom from March 2003. On 8 January 2010, the 437th transferred host unit responsibilities to the newly established 628th Air Base Wing as part of the Department of Defense Joint Basing Initiative. The 437th Airlift Wing remains at Charleston Air Force Base as the supported Mission wing.

Boeing C-17 Globemaster III of the 437th Airlift Wing taxiing for departure at the 2018 RIAT, England


The group consists of the following units:

World War II

From May–December 1943, the 437th Troop Carrier Group trained with cargo planes in Indiana, Missouri, and North Carolina. In January 1944, the group deployed to England, where it prepared for the invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. During the Normandy campaign, the group released gliders over Cherbourg and carried troops, weapons, ammunition, rations, and other supplies for the 82nd Airborne Division in Operation Neptune. For these actions, the group received a Distinguished Unit Citation.

The air echelon deployed to Italy in July 1944 and participated in the Allied invasion of southern France in August 1944 dropping paratroops of the 1st Airborne Task Force. During Operation Market Garden in September 1944, the group released gliders carrying troops and equipment for the airborne attack in the occupied Netherlands. In December 1944, the group re-supplied the 101st Airborne Division in the Bastogne area of Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge. After moving to France in February 1945, the unit released gliders in support of an American crossing of the Rhine River called Operation Varsity in March 1945. The 437th continued to supply the offensive forces in April, while also evacuating wounded personnel to rear-zone hospitals. After V-E Day, the group evacuated prisoners of war and displaced persons to relocation centers. The group then returned to the United States and was inactivated.

Cold War

Trained as a reserve unit until August 1950, when it was ordered to active duty because of the outbreak of war in Korea and later moved to Japan in November 1950. Between December 1950 and June 1952, the group airlifted ammunition, rations, aircraft parts, gasoline, and other war supplies from Japan to United Nations bases in Korea, while evacuating wounded troops from Korea to hospitals in Japan. During 1951, the 437th also dropped paratroops and flew re-supply and reinforcement missions in support of the Eighth Army in Korea. Between January–June 1952, the group transported battlefield replacements and evacuated troops on leave. From June 1952 – November 1957, the group again served as Reserve training organization flying C-46s.

Modern era

Activated as part of Objective Organization adoption by 437 AW in October 1991. Assumed control of operational squadrons. Routinely deployed aircraft and aircrews in support of humanitarian and contingency operations in the Balkans, Southwest Asia, Africa, Russia, and provided disaster relief support, 1992–2001. Supported Global War on Terrorism contingencies from October 2001–.

Lineage

  • Established as 437 Troop Carrier Group on 15 April 1943
  • Redesignated 437 Troop Carrier Group, Medium, on 10 May 1949
  • Activated in the Reserve on 15 June 1952
  • Redesignated: 437 Operations Group on 24 September 1991

Assignments

    , 1 May 1943 , February 1944 , 17 February 1944 , 10 July 1945
  • U.S. Forces European Theater, 18 July 1945
    , 6 August 1945 , 4–15 November 1945 , 27 June 1949 – 10 June 1952 15 June 1952–16 November 1957 , 1 October 1991–present

Stations

    , Indiana, 1 May 1943 , Missouri, 8 June 1943 , North Carolina, 10 October 1943 , Indiana, 29 December 1943–c. 12 January 1944 (AAF-482), England, January 1944 (AAF-469), England, 5 February 1944
    (A-58), France, 24 February – 28 July 1945 , Indiana, 15 August 1945 , Texas, 14 September – 15 November 1945 , Illinois, 27 June 1949 , South Carolina, 14 August – 16 October 1950 , Japan, 8 November 1950 – 10 June 1952 , Illinois, 15 June 1952 – 16 November 1957 , South Carolina, 1 October 1991–present

Components

    : 1 April 1992–present : 1 October 1993–present : 1 October 1993 – 29 September 2000 1 July 2002–present : 1 October 1991–present : 1 October 1991 – 1 October 1993 : 1 December 1991 – 1 October 1993 : 1 October 1991 – 1 October 1993
    : 1 October 1991 – 1 April 1992
    (T2): 1 May 1943 – 15 November 1945 27 June 1949-10 June 1952 15 June 1952 – 16 November 1957 (Z8): 1 May 1943 – 15 November 1945 27 June 1949–10 June 1952 15 June 1952 – 16 November 1957 (90): 1 May 1943 – 15 November 1945 27 June 1949–10 June 1952 15 June 1952 – 1 July 1957 (5K): 1 May 1943 – 15 November 1945 27 June 1949–1 August 1950 26 January 1951 – 10 June 1952.

Aircraft


437th Troop Carrier Group

The image is free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © Mark Newton (WMR-70128)

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Memorial details

Current location

Holy Cross Church
Dyers Yard
Ramsbury
North Wiltshire
Wiltshire
SN8 2QU
England

OS Grid Ref: SU 27370 71591
Denomination: Church of England

  • Second World War (1939-1945)
    Total names on memorial: 73
    Served and returned: 0
    Died: 73
    Exact count: yes
    Information shown: Forename, surname
    Order of information: Surname
  • Tablet
    Measurements: Undefined
    Materials: Stone
  • This memorial is not currently listed. Find out how to nominate this memorial for inclusion on the National Heritage List for England
  • More about listing and the protection of historic places can be found on the Historic England website
  • 437th Troop Carrier Group
  • WMO ID: 242038
  • Condition: Good [last updated on 14-02-2020]

This record comprises all information held by IWM’s War Memorials Register for this memorial. Where we hold a names list for the memorial, this information will be displayed on the memorial record. Please check back as we are adding more names to the database.

This information is made available under a Creative Commons BY-NC licence.

This means you may reuse it for non-commercial purposes only and must attribute it to us using the following statement:


437th Troop Carrier Group 9th Air Force USAAF

The image is free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © Mark Newton (WMR-24164)

Embed

Use this image under non-commercial licence

This image was created and shared by: Mark Newton 29.04.2015

The image is free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM. For this item, that is: © Mark Newton 29.04.2015 (WMR-24164)

Embed

Memorial details

Current location

Holy Cross Church
28 High Street
Ramsbury
Kennet
Wiltshire
SN8 2QP
England

OS Grid Ref: SU 27385 71599
Denomination: Church of England

  • Second World War (1939-1945)
    Total names on memorial: 73
    Served and returned: Undefined
    Died: 73
    Exact count: no
    Information shown: surname,forename
    Order of information: surname
  • Tablets
    Measurements: Undefined
    Materials: Stone
  • This memorial is not currently listed. Find out how to nominate this memorial for inclusion on the National Heritage List for England
  • More about listing and the protection of historic places can be found on the Historic England website

This record comprises all information held by IWM’s War Memorials Register for this memorial. Where we hold a names list for the memorial, this information will be displayed on the memorial record. Please check back as we are adding more names to the database.

This information is made available under a Creative Commons BY-NC licence.

This means you may reuse it for non-commercial purposes only and must attribute it to us using the following statement:


The group consists of the following units:

Lineage

  • Established as 437 Troop Carrier Group on 15 Apr 1943
  • Redesignated 437 Troop Carrier Group, Medium, on 10 May 1949
  • Activated in the Reserve on 15 Jun 1952
  • Redesignated: 437 Operations Group on 24 Sep 1991

Assignments

    , 1 May 1943 , Feb 1944 , 17 Feb 1944 , 10 Jul 1945
  • U.S. Forces European Theater, 18 Jul 1945
    , 6 Aug 1945 , 4-15 Nov 1945 , 27 Jun 1949-10 Jun 1952 15 Jun 1952-16 Nov 1957 , 1 Oct 1991-Present

Stations

    , Indiana, 1 May 1943 , Missouri, 8 Jun 1943 , North Carolina, 10 Oct 1943 , Indiana, 29 Dec 1943-c. 12 Jan 1944 (AAF-482), England, Jan 1944 (AAF-469), England, 5 Feb 1944
    (A-58), France, 24 Feb-28 Jul 1945 , Indiana, 15 Aug 1945 , Texas, 14 Sep-15 Nov 1945 , Illinois, 27 Jun 1949 , South Carolina, 14 Aug-16 Oct 1950 , Japan, 8 Nov 1950-10 Jun 1952 , Illinois, 15 Jun 1952-16 Nov 1957 , South Carolina, 1 Oct 1991-Present

Components

    : 1 Apr 1992-Present : 1 Oct 1993-Present : 1 Oct 1993-29 Sep 2000 1 Jul 2002-Present : 1 Oct 1991-Present
  • 20 Airlift Squadron: 1 Oct 1991-1 Oct 1993 : 1 Dec 1991-1 Oct 1993 : 1 Oct 1991-1 Apr 1992
  • 51 Transport (later, 51 Troop Carrier) Squadron: 1 Jun 1942-14 Nov 1945 : 1 Oct 1991-1 Oct 1993
  • 83 Troop Carrier Squadron (T2): 1 May 1943-15 Nov 1945 27 Jun 1949-10 Jun 1952 15 Jun 1952-16 Nov 1957
  • 84 Troop Carrier Squadron (Z8): 1 May 1943-15 Nov 1945 27 Jun 1949-10 Jun 1952 15 Jun 1952-16 Nov 1957
  • 85 Troop Carrier Squadron (90): 1 May 1943-15 Nov 1945 27 Jun 1949-10 Jun 1952 15 Jun 1952-1 Jul 1957
  • 86 Troop Carrier Squadron (5K): 1 May 1943-15 Nov 1945 27 Jun 1949-1 Aug 1950 26 Jan 1951-10 Jun 1952.

Aircraft

  • C-47, 1943-1945
  • C-53, 1943-1945
  • C-109, 1945
  • CG-4A, 1943-1945
  • Horsa glider, 1944
  • C-46, 1949-1952 1952-1957
  • C-119, 1951
  • C-141, 1991-2000
  • C-17, 1993-Present

Operations

World War II

From May-December 1943, the 437th Troop Carrier Group trained with cargo planes in Indiana, Missouri, and North Carolina. In January 1944, the group deployed to England, where it prepared for the invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. During the Normandy campaign, the group released gliders over Cherbourg and carried troops, weapons, ammunition, rations, and other supplies for the 82nd Airborne Division in Operation Neptune. For these actions, the group received a Distinguished Unit Citation.

The air echelon deployed to Italy in July 1944 and participated in the Allied invasion of southern France in August 1944 dropping paratroops of the 1st Airborne Task Force. During Operation Market Garden in September 1944, the group released gliders carrying troops and equipment for the airborne attack in the occupied Netherlands. In December 1944, the group re-supplied the 101st Airborne Division in the Bastogne area of Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge. After moving to France in February 1945, the unit released gliders in support of an American crossing of the Rhine River called Operation Varsity in March 1945. The 437th continued to supply the offensive forces in April, while also evacuating wounded personnel to rear-zone hospitals. After V-E Day, the group evacuated prisoners of war and displaced persons to relocation centers. The group then returned to the United States and was deactivated.

Cold War

Trained as a reserve unit until Aug 1950, when it was ordered to active duty because of the outbreak of war in Korea and later moved to Japan in Nov 1950. Between Dec 1950 and Jun 1952, the group airlifted ammunition, rations, aircraft parts, gasoline, and other war supplies from Japan to United Nations bases in Korea, while evacuating wounded troops from Korea to hospitals in Japan. During 1951, the 437th also dropped paratroops and flew re-supply and reinforcement missions in support of the Eighth Army in Korea. Between Jan-Jun 1952, the group transported battlefield replacements and evacuated troops on leave. From Jun 1952-Nov 1957, the group again served as Reserve training organization flying C-46s.

Modern era

Activated as part of Objective Organization adoption by 437 AW in Oct 1991. Assumed control of operational squadrons. Routinely deployed aircraft and aircrews in support of humanitarian and contingency operations in the Balkans, Southwest Asia, Africa, Russia, and provided disaster relief support, 1992-2001. Supported Global War on Terrorism contingencies from Oct 2001-.


USAAF 437th Troop Carrier Group

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